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Do’s and Don’ts of Lone Worker Safety

1 May 2018
 May 1, 2018

To keep you safe when working alone, we’ve come up with a series of quick and easy tips on what you should and shouldn’t do when lone working.

Do’s

Do let people know your whereabouts

Make sure that at least one other person is aware that you’re working alone, where you’ll be doing this and how long for, in case something goes wrong and you need help.

Do your own mini risk assessment

Before you start, identify any possible safety issues and inform someone if you discovery anything that could be potentially unsafe.

Do follow relevant safety training and guidelines

It’s easy to forget or ignore health and safety advice, particularly if you’re doing a task that you’ve done many times before, but it’s important to remember your training at all times and follow appropriate safety guidelines.

Do carry a personal alarm

If you get into a difficult situation personal alarms can be a lifesaver, these provide you will a quick and easy way to get assistance should you need to. Some lone worker alarms can even activate automatically in the event of a fall and send your location to your colleagues or the emergency services.

 

Don’ts

Don’t assume nothing will ever happen to you

When it comes to safety, complacency is your worst enemy. Lone workers must take responsibility for their own safety. Be prepared and alert, make sure you know of any dangers and avoid cutting corners where safety is concerned. Often those who think they won’t get hurt are the ones that do.

Don’t attempt anything that cannot be done safely alone

If it’s not safe for one person to do a task by themselves then find someone to help you. Don’t try to overstretch yourself, as this can make accidents more likely to occur.

Don’t take unnecessary risks

Working alone makes you more vulnerable if something was to go wrong, therefore you should be even more vigilant and mindful of your safety than usual and avoid anything that may put you in harm’s way.

Don’t be afraid to trust your instincts

Don’t do anything that you’re uncomfortable with. This could be anything from operating machinery alone to entering a client’s premises if you feel threatened. The golden rule is – be safe, don’t be sorry.